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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 253 (some duplicates have been removed)
students, who have joined us to go on an exploration of religion. but what a journey it is. [ music ] [male voice:] so be it. [crowd:] so be it. [male voice:] tonight - [crowd:] tonight - [dr. simons:] this is armageddon, the field of armageddon. this is definitely not your father's oldsmobile. we're at the western wall, the last remaining wall of the second temple. we're at the san francisco zen center. it was the site of illinois greatest religious drama - the exodus of the mormons. this is the spot where jesus reputedly cried for jerusalem. [ music ] [male voice:] i'm not talking about god or buddha. [ music ] [female voice:] at the end of it, what is it for? for peace. [male voice:] you just discover it within our selves. [dr. simons:] we'll go through 24 classes in which we'll meet real believers from real religious settings and then we've added two new classes, the twenty fifth and the twenty sixth class back in the setting in which we'll discuss issues such as religion and violence, very much on people's minds. religion and science - new ways that science is helping us understand spi
's a tendency to say, "well, if you study all the religions, you water down your own religion." is there a way that a model or technique people might use, to cherish the integrity of their own views yet appreciate other worldviews or are we just barking up the wrong tree here? [prof. marty:] what's the big difference between appreciating and adopting? we once had a class in this campus where four people gave the views of the catholic mass. one took the role of freud, one of marx, one of marx's favorite, one of durkheim, four great students explaining that the mass is nothing but this, nothing but that. and after it was over a student in the class said that was very - you should have somebody there who believes in it. we said, "two of them do." a catholic can take on the role of being sigmund freud interpreting something in order to understand the phenomenon without yielding. i am a very reasonably intense member of the christian communion and for the last 35 - 40 years, i've been studying others. i believe i have real appreciation for them. i don't think i will go to the apostolic church of go
of religion, identity and relationship, and we'll be looking at that. i wanted to go to a roll-in, though, that we didn't get which is one of the more interesting ones we have at glide memorial methodist church out in san francisco. and this is, in a way, i think a little synchronicity here. maybe it's good we didn't get it in the last class because it's a good way to prompt some of the questions you might have about some of those key class themes we went over in our interview with cecil williams. now, this was quite a shoot. it's a fantastic church out in san francisco, and reverend williams said some amazing things about religion on this. but for the crew, what made the day, actually, it was my birthday - i went to church on my birthday when we did this shoot, and it was chaos. i mean, thousands of people around, nobody knew where we were supposed to go, we're sitting down with all our equipment like some rock stars on a battle of the bands, hanging around there, just waiting for stuff to happen. and all of a sudden, this movie star walks in - what's her name? anybody know her? tall? se
." and the age of aware just spawned the number of exotic religions, including zen buddhism and hindu meditation and from there into the jesus freak youth movement which swept through the ranks of the drug-depleted and sex-sated surfers of california and and from there into the jesus freak youth movement which swe . now, imam, do you detect any impact of the affluence of today on the spirituality of your -- your flock? >> indeed. i do believe that if i were to go back 20 years or see where muslims are going now, i do believe that the economic situation of muslims and the worldwide community will influence the way muslims see islam and see islam's spirituality as the way out of the dispair, out of the harmlessness, out of the -- homelessness and poverty that mums limbs have been experienced in the last 20 years. >> you serve as a muslim chaplain of georgetown university which is a roman catholic university in the sense it's run by jesuit priests, right? >> indeed, yeah. >> now, how is that going? >> i think it has gone, so far, very well. i have enjoyed working with the jesuits, with the roman ca
the old constitutional role and the new constitutional world when it comes to religion? >> for most of the nation's history with the states rather than the federal government that controlled access to the religious worship and organizations and so on. in the early decades that began to shift as the supreme court applied then national constitutional the establishment and centralizing debate about religion. >> but if the states had the control we had written to the constitution, freedom of religion. >> we did indeed the first amendment began congress shall enact no loss it was only to the national government. >> were there restrictions on different states? >> several states had religious establishments and most limited the amount of property a religious organization could owned, tax religious property, others ban given group's practices. i'm thinking for example we eventually and various states. >> when it came to massachusetts, talk about them as a case study of the state's regulating religion. it is starkly unconstitutional but in the last case was brought, the west criminal prosecu
to find out that money stands in the way of the public knowing more about her. >> reporter: for "religion & ethics newsweekly", i'm david tereshchuk. >>> the city of grand rapids, michigan, long ago became known as a place of strict dutch reformed calvinism. so in 2012, it was something of a surprise when grand rapids organized a year-long series of events all designed to promote interfaith understanding. by all accounts, the campaign was a great success, as judy valente reports. >> reporter: grand rapids, michigan, is a city with deep roots in conservative calvinist christianity -- a place where dancing and card-playing were once banned, mowing the lawn on sunday was frowned upon into the 1960s, and in more recent years, a professor who taught evolution at calvin college encountered harsh criticism. though the dutch reformed church and its more conservative offshoot, the christian reformed church, is still a strong presence here, grand rapids today is also home to 82 catholic parishes, 5 mosques, 2 synagogues, and hindu, buddhist and sikh temples. interfaith dialogue would have been cons
don't trust other religions, but i started to feel a connection to scientology when i saw they were able to afford an ad in this sunday's superbowl. [laughter] i mean, that's the religious big-time. i don't know how the catholic church is going to compete. the pope is going to have to get some clydesdales. [laughter] scientology was founded in 1954 by science fiction author and millionaire-on-gilligan's-island l. ron hubbard. [laughter] so what do scientologists believe? basically that we're all extraterrestrial beings called "thetans" trapped in an earth body, after galactic leader xenu brought the thetans here, stacked them up around volcanos, and blew them up with hydrogen bombs. i'm sorry, jimmy, is that correct in my prompter? that is kind of, wow -- wow, bit of a stretch. wait 'til i tell my priest about this before he intercedes with god for me who then forgives my sins after i say a prayer whatever number of times the priest told me to. [laughter] [cheers and applause] unfortunately, the church has had some recent public relations problems. for instance, it seems scientology
religion tiene un padrino que los dirije, le llaman tata y es una relación con dios conjocido como sambia y los es piritus de la naturaleza segun los seguidores. >> el palo es una religion de culto a los ansestros , los rituales del palo se hacen para los nuevos miembros o para efecturar un don de gracia al muerto que rige cada muerto. >> tiene su origen en la cuenta del conco del africa central donde un grupo de esclavos fueron llevados a cuba. >> ahora vamos a la matanza o sacrificio de los animales. >> algúnos confunden la religion con la santeria pero son cosas muy diferentes. >> la santeria es de origen indigena de la religion tradición en nigeria . >> durante el ritual me llevaron al cnetro de la habitascion y me pasaron el gallo por todo el cuerpo antes de sacrificarlo. >> la influencia del catolicismo existe en el espiritu santo. >> el tata baila por horas . >> se siente como si otra persona estuviera encima de ti y no siento nada. >> se estima que hay pocos palerosw genuinos en cuba. >> si quieren ver imagens ineditos de estas imágenes visiten página en mpantalla. >> consumir a
. in 2011, he returned to germany and he told parliament that religion had lost its meaning for many people. the most recent controversy was the saw the pointing to corruption in the highest echelon of the church. >> all three monotheistic religions go back to the same origin with abraham being a father. nevertheless, relations between judaism, islam, and christianity remain strained. there have been raise of hope and moments of reconciliation. in our next report, we look at relations during the popsy of pope benedict -- papacy of benedict xvi. >> his speech was meant to be clear signal of improved relations. >> shalom. i would like to take this opportunity to assure you that i intend to continue with all my strength toward improved relations with the jewish people. that is the path on which john paul ii took great steps. >> years later, he visited auschwitz. but this was just one side of a tricky balancing act. his actions within the church causing doubts about his commitment to the friendship. in 2007, benedict revived the mass that satisfied a conservative catholics, but it includes the
with religions for $200, alex. kelton. what is islam? right. religions for $400. kelton, again. who is bacchus? bacchus or dionysus. yes. religions for $600 please. kelton. what is judaism? good. religions for $800. kelton. what is evangelicalism? little more specific. what is charismatic evangelicalism? no. joe or tori? joe. who are jehovah's witnesses? no. tori's not gonna ring in be a this? "what is pentecostal?" that's what we were going for. kelton, we come back to you, though. religions for $1,000 alex. answer -- daily double.on [ applause ] you have but $400. however, you can risk up to $1,000. i'll risk $1,000. okay. here is the clue. what is sikhism?
that it is an attack on their religion? >> i'm not affecting their religion. it is their religion, not mine. as i see it, i always learn from my parents that god is love. that is the only thing i do -- i love my partner and i love my children. what is wrong with that? >> and you are also religious? >> yes, we are. >> you are religious. within your church, has there been an acceptance that you did not expect or not acceptance? how has that operated within your church? >> that are fun of it. it is not a problem at all. it is not an issue, although, for us, it is not possible to get married in church at the moment. it is not an issue that we are lesbians and having kids and have a legal marriage. >> thank you very much for joining us. >> the excesses' of large banks before the global economic meltdown have been well documented, but this week, the light was turned on to a particularly touchy practice known as the libor fixing scandal and a worryingly unregulated system where banks were able to fix lending rates in a way that could benefit them financially. this week, the royal bank of scotland was fined
the rise of individualism in american life, the sustainability of social welfare programs, religion and population aging and we get to all of those in the next hour but first why don't you answer for me the question that every reporter is asked by his or her editor when that per approaches the idea why does this matter, why is it important? >> guest: it's important because the demographics are what my friend it's like the tectonic plates shifting beneath the earth and demography isn't quite destiny which is the oelwein sogegian know what the profile is than you are able to today what are the confines and the reality in this country. people are choosing to have fewer and fewer children. this is the first time in history that this happened voluntarily at a global scale and it's going to have far-reaching consequences for everyone. >> host: how do we know that it's falling, how is it measured and are we talking about a year or a few years, a decade and where has it happened? >> guest: they keep track of these things as you know how many people there are and how many people are born eac
parents like that. very modern. very open-minded. unlike for some, there's no question of religion, of color of skin, or anything like that. people can be all beautiful. it depends on who they are, but it is not a question of color. for me, both of us were beautiful. and i loved color. color of the skin. tattoo on the skin, which is a kind of color. some blue colors that you add. and i wanted to show that. when i started, i remember that there were some beautiful girls. they're beautiful. but i felt like, ok, but there is also beauty. i have a girlfriend which was modeling for me that i met very early when i started that was from a french colony. she was beautiful and black and very inspiring, very nice. i say, yes, why not. for me, a difference was beautiful. they looked to me, and i wanted to show it. another kind of different was the fact that when i saw farida, i said, my god, she is incredible. i was very impressed by her beauty. very frightened even by her beauty. she was kind of a very arrogant imperial. and african and beauty with a special expression. not arrogant. but bea
to associate with their religion, but something real and in control of their own will, so farewell to the old image. let's look get the new -- look at the new haiti. tavis: what would you say is the typical american view? >> there is a lot of reality. impoverished. we associate in the u.s. poverty with backwardness, especially in a nation filled with akron people is american thing. and there is to do, -- is voodoo, and that image of them being associated with religion thought of assets -- as superstition and black magic. i have gone to a lot of voodoo ceremonies, and they are not what the american impression is. >tavis: how wrong with you say the impression is that we have of haiti? >> i would say in many ways it is incorrect. haitians, once removed from port-au-prince, if you go to a village, these people are self- sufficient. they are poor, but they are communitarian. they help each other. they worked together, but once you put them in a cash economy, competition becomes very tense for a few resources. tavis: what entity, individual branch would you point the finger at for who is responsibl
she adored but who opposed both marriage and religion. then she learned she was pregnant again, and that changed everything. dorothy day converted to catholicism at the age of 30 and was baptized in this church near her home in staten island. she turned to god, she said, in gratitude and joy over the birth of her only child. she broke off with the baby's father and raised her daughter alone, still working as a journalist but searching for a way to connect her social values to her deepening faith. the answer was to start "the catholic worker," a newspaper priced at a penny that's still published today, and that provided funds for a growing movement to help the poor. >> if your broth is hungry, yofeed him. you don't meet him at the door and say, "go be thou filled," or "wait for a few weeks, and you'll get a welfare check." you sit him down and feed him. and so that's how the soup kitchen started. >> reporter: jane sammon joined the catholic worker movement near the end of day's life. >> here was a group of people who really, really were talking issues about the poor, but they we
. >> it is a surprise but also, i guess, a big challenge because use live the pope, according to the catholic religion, he is effectively god's representative on earth. not the sort of job you resign from. if you remember, " john paul ii the died in 2005, the predecessor, it was a very long illness and it was obvious to everyone the pope was not well. but the vatican has a way of keeping things going, keeping up assad going, at least, up until the pope passes on and then a new one is elected. his is a very strange situation. unknown situation. my vatican sources are telling me that it is probably not going to be the same procedure that would have happened had hoped benedick died. using that is followed by a mourning period and then a conclave, calling to run the princes of the church, 100 or so carnots that represent the catholic church from the world. a sealed themselves and decided to should be elected. the conclave obviously will have to happen regardless. we will not have a mourning period because the pope has not passed away. very interesting. we have the date of the resignation, february 28. i t
in alabama heads into the fifth day. >>> leon panetta said his catholic religion had an impact on his life and death decisions. >>> and rumors of muhammad ali's death are premature. we'll explain. death are premature. we'll explain. "early today" starts right now. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> very good monday morning to you. i'm veronica de la cruz. we begin with a developing tragedy in southern california. a bus carrying a tour group from tijuana collided with two other vehicles on the highway west of los angeles killing eight and injuring more. authorities say the driver reported brake problems as the bus came down the mountain. it rear-ended a car before flipping and hitting a pickup truck that was hauling a trailer. passengers described the scene. >> starts to move so fast, and the people start screaming. >> two or three minutes swerving in and out? >> yeah. >> everybody was scared. everybody was screaming. >> the bus was reportedly returning from a ski outing to big bear. >>> well, today president obama will travel to minneapolis to push his proposal for broader g
children, health, danger, settling disputes, war, religion, and speaking more than one language. this book is my most personal book read the most practical values of our daily lives and as a shameless author, it is about what i have learned from spending a lot of my time in traditional societies over the last 50 years. it is what other scholars have related to other societies around the world are you we are accustomed to living in big, industrial society, permanent housing with central government to make decisions. writing in books and the internet. most people live past age 60 we regularly encounter strangers, just as i am encountering you this evening. most of us eat food grown by a other people. we forget that every one of those things have evolved in human history. it is a separate biological evolution over about 6 million years. the things i just mentioned did not exist anywhere in the world 11,000 years ago. they were only within the last 11,000 years or it some of them, such as the internet and most people living past age 60, arose only within the last century or two. that is the an
about books. >> what role does religion play? it seems to be important in who is going to have children and who is not, but it's in the sense of belief that in attendance the church services or other participation. can you talk about that a little bit? >> it is a fascinating subject because it has changed. if you go back and look at the national statistics report the demographers back then looked at the catholics and protestants and as it happens. over the years conflict fertility increase and demographers said this was the end of catholic fertility. they were no longer special but instead something much more interesting happened. it no longer mattered what your actual belief was to the matter if you were jewish or more men are catholic or protestant. all the matter is how often you attended your services and so there's a straight line between the increased fertility etc. so if you go once every two months your fertility is higher than if you go not at all and if you go once a month it is higher still. if you go once a week it is higher still and not only that but your ideal fertility.
. many say the church is on a slope to being a third world religion and it's looking to many like the next pontiff will come from latin america or africa. i'd like to see a progressive american become pope and usher this church into the 20th 20th century or maybe the 18th or 19th centuries. if you travel this country and visit churches, as i do, you'll see older congregations and a priest who is not from america more often than not. something that to be done if they want to save this church. i could talk all night about the fact that the c. >> jennifer:celibacy rule is antiquated. it's the man made hang ups of an unauthorized fan club getting in the way of a lot of people. the facebook one religious group in our people are people raised religious and feel spiritual but let down by american religion. >> 24% identify with religion today that they were raised in. i want to ask you about money and the church. i'm going to get skeptical on you. how big a driving force is the ability for a european pope or to a degree an american pope to raise money for the church, where they would avoi
it clear while we don't have jurisdiction over religion in the same way we don't over sexual orientation, what we're seeing in all of these -- and all of these are case by case, you can't just broad sweep the laws -- when students are bullied and harassed in this world because of religion, in most instances a lot of that is not about race or religion, it's because. perception that students that share certain religious traits also share certain ethnicities and that is discrimination and that falls under title 6. it is not just about enforcing the laws that make it clear how the laws apply. it is, though, as we said, you can't get at this through enforcement alone. this is a culture that tolerates this and in too many ways promotes it. as tom mentioned we have an unprecedented partnership not just between our agencies but agencies across the federal government that the president has convened to bring our best resources and minds to bear to do something about it. there is now a web site, stopbullying.gov where a tool kit is being developed and these kinds of best practices are being promo
, religion and population aging. we'll get to all of those during the next hour. but first, why don't you answer for me the question that ever reporters asked by his or her editor and reporter purchase of purchased with a story idea. why does this matter? why is it important? >> and matters because fertility rates and demographics or what my friend phil long in town here at the new america foundation says it's like the tectonic plates shifting beneath the earth. demography isn't quite dead to me, but it's close. .. are we talking about a year, a few years, a decade, centuries, where is it happening? >> host: so the phenomena has begun in the west, it began around 1970. to back up quickly. the way we measure this is by simple birth statistics. it's not terribly difficult to do. when you have well organized societies to keep track of them you know how many people are born and their ages and their parent's ages. they calculate the birthrate, the general fertility rate and a total fertility rate. it's not a real number, in the sense that it's a hard and fast number. it's a statistical constru
, that the religion is what it is, and you live by the rules because that's what the faith is about. what is faith? what is the church? what should be the right rules? and maybe the expedience of the moments, if we just adjust to the times, you se some sense of what the faith is at its core. that's certainly the orthodox position. on the other hand, you've got lots of catholics from my generation who want to see it be more exclusive and sclus inclus inviting, and would want that from the pope. >> especially when it comes to birth control. mary ann walsh sort of pooh-poohed that, but it is very important to catholic women. almost 90% of catholic women have taken birth control at some point in their lives. >> and there are no women priests or women in positions of power, not to denegrate in any way the nuns and the amazing influence they had on many lives, including mine as a catholic student. but this pope himself, very interesting, called the rottweiler of god, so strict to orthodoxy, he got into a point of confusion, right, because when he was talking about africa, the first time that they talked
is. i went from republicans to independents, to democrat. three reasons. number one, i want religion out of the party. i have a religion. that's my business. i have a political party. that's the political parties business. number two, women's issues. i don't personally believe in abortion, but i don't believe i have the rights tell my neighbor what they should do. i think the republican party needs to get out of people's bedrooms and back into the boardrooms. number three, the middle-class tax hikes their break-in instituted. we never recovered from that. to my city unions. all things that had middle-class workers. ending tax like state sales tax, all of these things it is strictly, so i know when it happened. it was in the reagan years. >> host: thanks, caller. >> guest: >> guest: a few republican come you a liberal one. undertake the supporters. she says she wants religion out of politics. i wonder she would've felt that way about the civil rights movement because it is actually martin luther king was not only a top her. he was also the reverend dr. martin luther king. the power of
religion, but particularly islam, there's not always a clear understanding to what the first amendment guarantees, which is the right to teach about a religion but not proselytize about it. i think there's fear of associating with anyone associated with islam. there are events outside our control that creates more interest and unfortunately also makes people more afraid. one of the programs we are about to launch is putting all our content online so a teacher in north dakota where there are no muslim, potentially, no expert can come to her classroom, they can go to our web site and download the content and teach the things we are teaching. >> i think partnerships are the best way to overcome the limitations because we all have limitations. and sometimes it's just visibility. we actually have on our web site 50 short films and one of them is a muslim student from a school in fremont going to a school in arinda talking about what it's like going to school as a muslim in the united states and they are asking questions and you see we are all kids in school and we have more similaritie
"talibanistan: negotiating the borders between terror, politics and religion" which expores the threat posed by extremist who operate in the border area between afghanistan and pakistan. this is about an hour and a half. ♪ good morning. good afternoon, everybody. welcome. i'm steve cool i'm the president of new america foundation. it's my pleasure to welcome do you to the event briefly and introduce our subject, which from our perspective involves the launch of the book that somebody will hold up for the audience. since i don't have a copy. "talibanistan." i just wanted to say a few words about where this book came from and why the subject matter. you'll hear discussed today struck us as worthy of what became really a couple of years of endeavor at new america lead by peter bergen who will be the host and moderator through most of the program today. peter and katherine who is not here with us today. coed ditted this book from the oxford university press. it's a collection of scholarly and journalistic articles about the taliban and the environment in southern afghanistan and western pakist
-rights laws that prohibit firing, promoting and hiring based on race, age, national origin, religion, pregnancy, those immutable characteristics that we think are worthy of the protection of our civil rights laws. in most states there are modest exemptions to the employment at will dadoctrine, amount wrongful discharge. when an employer requires someone to break the law in order to keep their job. or if an employer is doing something that is in violation of a well-defined written public policy. other than that, we give employers in this country wi de latitude, because we have a free market economy, because we recognize the person that takes the risk and set up a business and puts their monetary and human capital into it, that they have rights to run their business the way they see fit. we are very, very reluctant to place any sort of restrictions on that. again, this is a small one. not saying that you have to hire anybody that is not fully qualified for your job. in essence, what these laws do rainout are saving employers from themselves, because if they are ignoring all of the unem
in prayer each week, members of the prayer caucus also work together to preserve the presence of religion, faith and morality in the marketplace of ideas. we're seeing increased efforts to remove references to god and fate from the public square. activists seek to remove god from our national motto and pledge of allegiance. they seek to prevent city and county councils from praying and recognizing our nation's spiritual heritage. and they seek to silence people who wish to live out their faith. members of the prayer caucus have countered these efforts successfully, ensuring that our history remains in tact for future generations. in the 112th congress, i introduced a resolution reaffirming our national motto, in god we trust, and encouraging its public display in public buildings. the measure passed overwhelmingly by a vote of 396-0. some asked why we needed to reaffirm our national motto. yet if left unstated, the motto could be changed in a de facto matter. in november, 2010, before a worldwide audience and a much publicized speech focusing on the united states relationship -- united st
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 253 (some duplicates have been removed)